Modern American School
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Arabic Department

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Arabic Level I

 

Students will learn how to ask and answer simple question, make routine requests in the classroom and in public places, read comprehend and respond to words and phrases in a variety of situations. Also they can exchange descriptions of people through oral descriptions. They will be able to read and write words and understand simple sentences. Students will be able to express feelings, and exchange simple opinions.

 

Arabic Level II

 

At each level, students have the opportunity to develop their communicative skills in a cultural context. They acquire and expand their knowledge of the language by engaging in guided conversations in settings such as the café, the home, and the school; by reading authentic materials such as menus, schedules, and signs; and by writing notes, postcards, and short letters.  In order to perform these functions, students learn the appropriate grammatical structures.  Varied methods such as group work paired work, and direct instruction are used to help all students develop communicative proficiency.

 

Arabic Level III

 

Students can participate in brief guided conversation related to needs , interests, likes , and dislikes. They can introduce themselves to others, identify ideas and topics from simple texts, and give short oral presentations. Students can exchange oral and written information with others who use the Arabic language.

 

Arabic 7 N

 

Students can participate in-group learning activities, develop and deliver individual presentations.

They will use meta- cognition strategies during reading to monitor comprehension, retain information form and respond to text after reading. Understand that writing is a process of skills, strategies, and practices for creating, revising, and editing variety of texts. They can express and support opinions, read and interpret stories. Students engage in conversation, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions and exchange opinions.

 

Arabic 8 N

  

Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions and exchange opinions, present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners on a variety of topics. They can examine cultural differences. They can write a paragraph demonstrating appropriate punctuation and structure; also they can respond to variety of questions.

 

Arabic 9 N

 

The course assumes that students speak and read Arabic as native speakers. The course aims to teach students to read and write Classical Arabic. They are taught grammar, vocabulary improvement and ‘pointing’. All work is taught in the context of Jordanian culture, history and religion. Extracts are taken form Arabic literature. Students are encouraged to take pride in and appreciate their literary heritage.

 

Arabic 10 N

 

The course assumes that students speak and read Arabic as native speakers. The course aims to teach students to read and write Classical Arabic. They are taught grammar be able to write in a good standard of classical Arabic. Students can engage in high standards of conversations, provide and obtain information and exchange opinions.

 

GCE Advanced Arabic

 

Students can participate in-group learning activities, develop and deliver individual presentations.

They will use meta- cognition strategies during reading to monitor comprehension, retain information form and respond to text after reading. Understand that writing is a process of skills, strategies, and practices for creating, revising, and editing variety of texts. They can express and support opinions, read and interpret stories. Students engage in conversation, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions and exchange opinions.

 

 

Arabic - General Culture

 

The course provides an in-depth overview of major trends in contemporary Jordanian culture. Representative samples from a wide range of cultural manifestations will be studied.  These include relevant selections from the domains of art, music, fashion, cuisine, drama, cinema, media, architecture, and – to a lesser extent – politics and interfaith dialogue, based on students' interests.  In addition to class work, students will be able to meet with a number of invited guests and visit a number of sites and institutions.  Students are expected to keep a journal in which they record their notes, queries, observations and critiques. We will also be examining various cultural discourses, to facilitate not only our discussion and conception of what is "Jordanian" or "Arab" but also our discussion of the problems of examining and studying contemporary Arab culture from a Western perspective.  Since no cultural product is divorced from the historical, social, political and economic context in which it is created, we will read various secondary materials on these subjects at the outset of the course. Moreover, the history of Jordan is in reality a history of the modern Middle East. The events that have transpired over the last hundred years, that have in fact shaped the region, are so interconnected with each other and with Jordan that by studying the history and politics of the country, one gains insight into the region as a whole. From the Arab Revolt against the Ottomans a century ago, to the creation of nation-states in the area, to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, to Arab wars and Arab peace with Israel, to strife and violence in neighboring Iraq, Syria and Egypt, to the Arab spring and political reform, and to the global war against terror, Jordan has consistently been involved.